Skip to main content

Visual Resources : Neil Hellman Library : The College of Saint Rose: Artistic Techniques

The Visual Resources office maintains the College of Saint Rose Image Collection through JSTOR Forum

Khan Videos/Artistic Techniques



Ancient and Byzantine mosaic materials

A video from The Art Institute of Chicago. Created by Getty Museum. Ancient and Byzantine mosaic materials.







Making Greek vases

In ancient Greece, the phrase "to make pottery" meant to work hard. This video from the Getty Museum reveals how the typical Athenian potter prepared clay, threw vases, oversaw firing, and added decoration or employed vase-painters.



Glassmaking technique: free-blown glass

Ancient glass makers near Jerusalem discovered they could inflate hot glass to make vessels quickly and more cheaply. Watch this ancient technique (footage from the Corning Museum of Glass). Created by Getty Museum.

Leonardo da Vinci’s Drawing Materials

Leonardo da Vinci’s Drawing Materials

The difference between egg tempera and oil paint

The difference between egg tempera and oil paint

From the BBC documentary "Leonardo da Vinci - The Man Who Wanted to Know Everything".

The Harvard Library That Protects The World's Rarest Colors

The Harvard Library

The most unusual colors from Harvard’s storied pigment library include beetle extracts, poisonous metals, and human mummies.

The Harvard Library That Protects The World’s Rarest Colors


If link above does not work please copy and past this link into a new browser window
https://www.fastcodesign.com/3058058/the-harvard-vault-that-protects-the-worlds-rarest-colors

What is Fresco?

What is Fresco?

Liana Sofia explains, "what is fresco?" during a short film that documents the creation of a 3 section Fresco. Fresco is an ancient medium that requires large works to be painted in sections called "giornate." Each "giornata" is a section of fresh plaster that must be painted on before it dries and signifies 1 painting day of approx 12-15 hours. This is a rare opportunity to view how frescoes like the famous Sistine Chapel ceiling, were created. After watching "What is Fresco?" be sure to watch "The Strappo Technique" a deeper look at the processes Liana uses to create her work.

Building the Great Cathedrals in Color

Building the Great Cathedrals - Cathedrals in Color

Except for the color in their stained glass windows, today, Gothic Cathedrals appear as drab as the material with which they were built: stone. But to medieval pilgrims, they were a kaleidoscopic feast for the eyes, inside and out. Watch this bonus scene from "Building the Great Cathedrals" and be sure to check out our website for lots more:

Link to providencepictures.com for more information

Making Green: Tempera versus Oil | National Gallery, London

Making Green: Tempera versus Oil | National Gallery, London

Watch a painting demonstration to learn about the different properties of green pigments bound in egg tempera and those mixed with oil, and see how these were used to achieve very different effects in masterpieces from the National Gallery's collection. This film accompanies the National Gallery exhibition 'Making Colour' (18 June - 7 September 2014).

More about the exhibition:

Link to nationalgallery.org.uk for more information

Getty Museum Playlist

Getty Museum: Making Art Series

Carved carnelians, painted parchment, finessed flesh tones... explore art techniques in these videos!

Link to the Getty Museum Make Art Playlist

Watch all the videos here.

Making Manuscripts

Making Manuscripts

An illuminated manuscript is a book written and decorated completely by hand. Illuminated manuscripts were among the most precious objects produced in the Middle Ages and the early Renaissance, primarily in monasteries and courts. Society's rulers--emperors, kings, dukes, cardinals, and bishops--commissioned the most splendid manuscripts.

Getty Museum: Making Art Series

Carved carnelians, painted parchment, finessed flesh tones... explore art techniques in these videos!

Link to the Getty Museum Make Art Playlist

Watch all the videos here.

Carving Marble

Carving Marble with Traditional Tools

Prior to the use of power tools, the same basic implements were used for stone carving for hundreds of years. Many of the sculptor's tools had a variety of functions and could be used at different stages of the carving process. In this video, watch a contemporary sculptor demonstrate the use of traditional tools--such as the tooth chisel, the point chisel, the drill, and the rasp--as he creates a finished figure of a woman from a block of marble.

Link to the Getty Museum Make Art Playlist

Watch all the videos here.

Sculpture Techniques

Victoria and Albert Museum - Sculpture Techniques

The world's leading museum of art and design

Link to Website

Casting Bronze: Indirect Lost-Wax Method

Casting Bronze: Indirect Lost-Wax Method

Bronze, a combination of copper, tin, and small amounts of other metals, has long been prized for its preciousness, endurance, and its ability to register fine details and reflect light. Beginning about 1500, patrons became intrigued by the famed bronze collections of antiquity and began their own collections of ancient and contemporary bronzes. After much experimentation, artists in the 1500s refined a technique of making bronzes called indirect lost-wax casting. This technique made possible the production of multiple versions of the same piece.

Getty Museum: Making Art Series

Carved carnelians, painted parchment, finessed flesh tones... explore art techniques in these videos!

Link to the Getty Museum Make Art Playlist

Watch all the videos here.

Gold-Ground Panel Painting

Gold-Ground Panel Painting

Before canvas came into general use at the end of the 1500s, wood panel was the support most often used for painting. Panel paintings were designed for specific sacred or secular purposes: they might be part of an altarpiece that adorned an altar, a small diptych used for worship at home, or a standard carried in a procession. Artists applied gold ground and expensive pigments to the most splendid panel paintings.

Getty Museum: Making Art Series

Carved carnelians, painted parchment, finessed flesh tones... explore art techniques in these videos!

Link to the Getty Museum Make Art Playlist

Watch all the videos here.

Pressure + Ink: Intaglio Process

Pressure + Ink: Intaglio Process

Produced in conjunction with the exhibition

German Expressionism: The Graphic Impulse.

Find out more at

http://moma.org/germanexpressionism

Special thanks to Phil Sanders,

Director and Master Printer,

Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop.

A program of The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts.

Created by Plowshares Media PlowsharesMedia.com

© 2011 The Museum of Modern Art, New York

LaunchPad: Making Ancient and Byzantine Mosaics

LaunchPad: Making Ancient and Byzantine Mosaics

There's more to mosaics than meets the eye. The design and arrangement of hundreds or thousands of tesserae (stone or glass cubes) was a complex process involving meticulous planning. However, before a mosaicist began any project, a solid foundation was necessary. From there, the artist could create a work of art that could last for centuries. In this video, a master mosaicist from the Chicago Mosaic School demonstrates the art of mosaic making by recreating a section of the Art Institute of Chicago's 5th century Byzantine mosaic fragment with a Man Leading a Giraffe.



This video was produced with the generous support of a Long Range Fund grant provided by the Community Associates of the Art Institute of Chicago. It was created for LaunchPad, a program of digital interpretive materials that supplement the viewing of works of art on display in the Art Institute of Chicago's galleries.


© 2010 The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago

LaunchPad: Ancient and Byzantine Mosaic Materials

The Art of Gem Carving

Since antiquity, gemstones have been engraved using the same methods. Follow the process from start to finish in this short video from the Getty Museum.


Getty Museum: Making Art Series

Carved carnelians, painted parchment, finessed flesh tones... explore art techniques in these videos!

Link to the Getty Museum Make Art Playlist

Watch all the videos here.

Champlevé Enamelling 1100-1250



Champlevé Enamelling 1100-1250

Between 1100-1250 specialist metalworkers flourished in the areas around Cologne (the Rhineland), Liège (the Meuse Valley) and Limoges (France). They supplied monasteries and churches with vessels essential for the rituals of the church, objects such as chalices, crosses, candlesticks, altarpieces and shrines. The technique of enamelling used intense heat to fuse glass onto a prepared metal surface. It allowed the metalworker to create brightly coloured images. Medieval enamellers used several different techniques but champlevé enamelling was one of the most common. The word champlevé means literally raised fields and refers to the way that beds were dug out of a copper plate to receive the powdered enamel. This film focuses on the champlevé technique. Enameller Phil Barnes was commissioned to produce a small plaque based on a detail from a reliquary chest made around 1180 in Limoges. The film highlights the key stages that were involved in producing champlevé enamel plaques. The basic process remains the same but medieval enamellers used kilns fuelled with charcoal and relied on their judgement when firing the enamel plaques.


Link to the Victoria and Albert Museum on YouTube

Technical Art History Website

University of Delaware

College of Arts & Sciences

Department of Art Conservation

KRESS

Technical Art History Website

Yale's Traveling Scriptorium - Great resource for materials used in manuscripts

Traveling Scriptorium

A Teaching Kit by the Yale University Library

Link to Website

Hadrian/ Bronze Casting Using The Lost-Wax Technique

Color Wheels, Tables & Charts Through History

Public Domain Review

Colour Wheels, Charts, and Tables Through History

Link to Website

How I’ts Made Marble Sculptures

How It's Made Marble Sculptures

How It's Made Marble Sculptures

Making A Medal Using the Sand Casting Process

Piece of Work